Tag Archives: Independence Day

HBD, America

Pop. There’s a reason we celebrate this country’s Declaration of Independence with fireworks. Doing so serves to remind that independence, ironically enough, has a continual dependency on being enforced by those on whom it is bestowed.

Many firecrackers, bottle rockets and other pyrotechnics are charged with a smaller granulation of the same sort of black powder that filled the horns of minutemen. If they were particularly well equipped, the same fine FFFg from a miniature horn might have primed their flintlock muskets, rifles, and pistols. Those discharges sending your cat under the bed are a microcosm of history repeating itself, as it will always.

Pop. Pop-pop. Men lined up at the Concord, Massachusetts North Bridge because they’d had their fill of the assumptive imposition of authority by other men. It was a time given to the long contemplation of ideas and the study of consequences exhibited in natural law, and in those ruminations arrived a realization:  folk, by their nature, are free.

Society has organized itself in various ways since civilization began. Uneven distribution of advantage, for most of history, led to those who have it and those who serve them. Life, too has its dependencies, and when ambition combines with the compulsion to direct the lives of others it seeks to control the distribution of necessities and restrict the means of resistance. The result of controls and restrictions imposed rather than adopted in consensus is tyranny.

Bad ideas are often institutionalized in the attempt to legitimize an indefensible precept, or to justify those arrangements which, for a time at least, prevent society from descending into chaos. So evolved the supposedly divine right of kings. Such led to inherited leadership, good or bad, and the tradition of being protected by those who, in turn, most enjoyed advantage. This particular vision of governance—that of nobles by subjects—endured for centuries, established colonies in foreign lands, and built empires.

Pop. People colonizing a new continent, folk who had to build for themselves, and protect themselves, and provide for themselves shared their challenges with others having identical attribute requirements for survival. They prospered, and their prosperity led to easement in the general standard of living. After some decades an era of enlightenment, fed by newly discovered time to read and think, had arrived.

They began to watch, and learn, and discern the natural rules of faithful living. Knowing as they did the will of God revealed in Scripture, they nurtured in long-held traditions whose utility was the preservation of reliable conventions through time rather than a single lifespan. Premises tested for soundness and then extended on the basis of merit rather than whim began to transmit from one mind to another through the printing press. Some of those questioned the dominant paradigm of monarchy.

Pop-pop. Men realized that just power derives from the consent of the governed. They perceived that souls kindled by their Creator were on equal footing at their appearance, each with the same moral responsibilities to each other and the God who created them, and with an identical duty to assert those in times when overly presumptive authority thought otherwise.

Pop. One shot was heard around the world, and the diametric opposition of ideas formed camps as patriots lit brushfires of freedom in the minds of their peers against the status quo. Ideological Americanism began to spread, fueled by the light of liberties promised to those who adopted morally upright and responsible living … the only sort that endures. In time, the Founders declared their right to govern themselves as they saw fit, and the ideology of America manifested in a new nation. Its citizens had to assert its independence against those who thought otherwise lest their freedom again degrade to subjection, and free folk took up a fight that will never end.

God’s enemy whispers egotism and self-aggrandizing false premises into the ears of those who’ve not guarded their minds, and therefore their souls, yet today. The voice of the enemy is like water. It seeps, then puddles, stagnates, and finally breaks out into a flood of evil when spiritual dams let loose. We are seeing this happen now, in the acting out of those lacking any clear vision of how to preserve themselves, their freedoms, or anything else.

Evil has not left us, for the same reason we exercise by lifting weights. God’s voice is in the arena as well, fortifying those who listen and lending the strength to stand upright in any flood. Those who clearly perceive their nature and that of their Creator will value gifts descending from Him over offerings of a world tempting us away with false premise and promise.

People must learn the same lessons as their forebears from time to time until reliable paradigms again solidify. To be free of each other, we must first be freed of sin beyond our own means, and only faith in a loving Creator leads to the lifting of that yoke through His grace. Freedom in all realms comes by listening, and studying, and discerning truths and solid ideas from those fatally flawed.

One may know when enlightenment arrives. It pops.

Happy Birthday, America. Choose to love. -DA

*****

In production news, Boone’s fifth adventure, A Garden in Russia, is nearing the three-quarters mark in production editing and on schedule to appear in September, God willing. If you’ve not started in on the titles of Boone’s File, there is no better time to catch up than before an epic drops.

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Bullies and Bloodings

It’s July Fourth here: America’s Independence Day. Two hundred and forty-one years have passed since men decided they’d had enough of unjust power, derived from sources other than the consent of the governed. The founders were being bullied, and being men and women of virtue chose to handle the situation in the only pragmatic fashion.

Portions of the news media are playing the victim lately by decrying ‘bullying’ from various actors in the White House. Gravitating toward reflexive complaint stems from moral, physical, and intellectual weaknesses generally defining the political Left. Strong and capable people neither make such claims nor are they as a rule susceptible to bullying at all. Should someone try, an aggressor is likely to have the tables turned instead, as when our forefathers eventually saw the fight through to Yorktown.

Such action requires individual initiative backed by grounded values engendering the confidence to oppose and overcome an aggressor. Conviction is the foundation of character, and if not present at the onset of conflict had better develop prior to facing any critical disadvantage. As always, natural law has no court of appeal, and it’s hardly surprising that when put to it snowflakes would call for their mothers instead.

Character is not an attribute only for hard times; it should also display as much in positions of advantage as under adversity. We should not be indistinguishable from what we oppose. One would think that a political figure who could truly embody the courage, strength and dignity of the American ideal would own the political scene. Half of us, however, reside on the left side of the bell-shaped curve and are being unfortunately accommodated in policy by the ideologically irresolute, even though they are empowered in Washington. Nothing better speaks of weakness so in contrast to the strengths of the men who signed the Declaration of Independence than leaders bullied while holding the high ground.

The spirit preventing such contemptible flaccidity, as is becoming apparent, is bestowed or withdrawn as we deserve. My character and Bosnian journalist Luci Crnjak, in Novel8/Sean3 King of a Lesser Hill, observes, “There has to be some difference between what they are and what we become. How does it matter who wins, otherwise?” Once patriotism is given over to statism—and the designators of supposedly oppositional political parties lose their distinction—the only choice left to a citizenry unwilling to transition to servitude is starting over.

An American conscience will neither submit nor compromise a righteous position, which is why so much effort is being put toward degrading its definitional values. A concurrent grail of the political Left, for example, is coercing faithful public servants into violations of conscience with the mantra “Do your job!” Being ungrounded, they have no concept of conscience as a higher order of loyalty than ruling or legislation and so are making the same mistake as did Britain in the eighteenth century. We can hope this will end the same way, though the dignity of Cornwallis surrendering his sword, even if undertaken by an intermediary, is more likely this time around to be replaced by another display of screaming denial accompanied by hysterical snot bubbles.

Strengths are cultivated individually, one soul at a time, with the aid of God’s Spirit to those seeking Him with their whole heart. Are there enough of us left? The winnowing of natural law never ceases, nor does it take notice of philosophical outrage in defiance of its canon. Only another time of crisis will judge us worthy, or not, should the Lord tarry in the interim. It never has been or will be any other way.

Choose to love, -DA

*****

In production news, being that Boone’s fourth novel is on the street, Daniel Sean Ritter’s next title has entered Content Edit. CE, unlike primary editing, is of an unpredictable span, though past performance by the Editress suggests a possible first quarter 2018 release, God willing.