Tag Archives: political fiction

Abomination

I’m not a prophet. I only pay attention. Perhaps that is a gift of the Spirit in itself, a companion of wisdom being the ability to anticipate consequences that seems notably lacking in numbers approaching half of my country’s citizens.

I’m not a preacher either. I can go down the list of qualifications set down by Paul to Timothy and Titus and see a definite pattern of hit and miss there. I am what I’ve been since you’ve known me:  just a guy who writes novels. And perhaps in all the thinking that came before them and arrived during those long hours of wordcraft, I found a precept or two worthy of passing along.

And that’s why I see a load of trouble dead ahead. Dear God.

I chose political fiction as my medium because it leverages the passion needed to write well, and I like to think I’ve accomplished that much at least. Faith and politics are inseparable in American ideology. Thomas Jefferson’s “wall of separation ” was delineated as between church and the state; the faith itself, arising out of the Judeo-Christian experience, provided the very foundation of ideological Americanism and continues to sustain the efforts of truly free citizen souls everywhere.

Part of writing well is not using words lightly. That being said, what is about to take place on January 20, barring any cataclysmic reset of political convention, is an abomination.

When one reads Proverbs 11:1 “Dishonest scales are an abomination to the LORD, but a just weight is His delight” (NKJV), one should intuit more is at stake in our transactions with each other than the integrity of weights and measures. It’s a warning against the temptation toward dishonest gain that God condemned through Moses: Thou Shalt Not Steal.

The preponderance of evidence, being the standard in civil suits as opposed to the higher standard of criminal cases, is that we are about to install a president who did not actually win the 2020 election. The list of convenient coincidences is too long for an honest intellect to accept:

  • Tens of thousands of Democrat ballots cast ignoring the downticket
  • The lack of Democrat gains in state houses and other local offices
  • Republican dominance in House races considered toss-ups
  • Fraudulent balloting in swing states exceeding the margin of victory
  • Visible and overwhelming support for the current president

This body of evidence consolidates into something more than speculation for a rational mind. Its implications are more than political; there is a deficit of essential character in souls who perpetrate such acts. They are transgressions God hates, and that sins so despicable as to be labeled abomination before the Lord should be ignored is a warning to those watching from a distance. The most dramatic lessons God presents benefit those out of the range of His consequential judgments.

Unanticipated consequences are the Achilles heel of faithless living generally, and never are they so clear as when the political left is empowered anywhere. It is tragic when it happens out of ignorance in the electorate. It is dangerous when such results from the level of fraud we witnessed in the 2020 national elections.

Before there was the present Constitution, Jefferson embraced in the Declaration of Independence the ideal of just powers, derived from the consent of the governed. After, the Founders shot at the British for years until the forebears of our present friends across the pond agreed to disagree, finally sailed east, and allowed a new nation to manage its own affairs.

History is cyclical, and we who study history are pretty much doomed to watch it repeat through the actions of those who do not, in the same manner that the faithful soul watches the less cognizant play in the street of faithless living. The righteously aggrieved make a formidable enemy when roused, and as the English poet John Dryden succinctly cautioned, one should “beware the fury of a patient man.”

Deplatforming and censorship won’t stop what will happen once the provocation of tyranny reaches critical mass. Communication via alternative media is already thriving, as is seen in the exponential growth of free speech havens such as Gab.com and the secure messaging app Signal. The unanticipated consequences of digital tyranny are costing former dominants Facebook and Twitter active accounts by the hundreds of thousands, and I am but one of those, as now reflected in the contact information on my Vae Obscurum About tab.

Consequences display varying levels of patience, but my guess is that resistance won’t take long to manifest. If I could teleport myself into the first presidential news conference of the incoming regime, my question would be, “Mister Biden, how does it feel being elevated to the presidency without having been elected?” The same question should be posed to every appointee in the upcoming follies. Shunning and shame are the traditional accompaniments to sin, and its lunch is certain to be served eventually. Faithful living knows this.

In America, governance is not exclusive to Washington. The several states have a great deal to say in what happens within their own borders, and the power of legislative nullification will predictably be in play during the approaching troubled times. Be the people, and encourage your legislators to keep the Republic, so the people themselves won’t need to again assert themselves as our Founders did.

Failing all, the final refuge for the faithful soul is the power of its sustaining belief under persecution. These are worldly concerns of an arena in which Jesus assured us we would have trouble. Immediately, though, He reminded us that He has already conquered that same world. There is a better one waiting, but past a time of trouble warned of long ago. It will be governed in righteousness by the promise of Emanuel, or God With Us.

The qualifications of a pastor I referenced at the onset of this post are immeasurably exceeded by our Craftsman, and mere shadows of the concern and divine love He holds for us. These fateful days on the horizon are presented to make us strong in carrying ourselves through them to better times. It will be so following the same vein of wisdom as inspired Robert Heinlein, when he advised that we not handicap our children by making their lives easy.

Being closer in my timeline to a personal clock that begins counting up instead of down, I can confirm this. It is better by far to be strong than comfortable.

Choose to love, -DA

*****

In production news, the Editress is at midpoint in the processes by which she vets a manuscript in content editing, next up being Sean Ritter’s return to Bosnia in Sister’s Shadow. Unfortunately, completion of Content Edit is not able to be projected due to the nature of the project. Following, we anticipate some 175 days of production editing, unless more time becomes available. As of now, it appears Sean’s next would appear in mid- to late summer, God willing.

Ghosts of the Republic

What if both sides stopped caring about rules?

I wrote the initial draft of Novel12/Boone6 Ghosts of the Republic five years ago. This was during the end of the Obama administration, when a biased media was putting forth every effort in convincing the country that Hillary Clinton would be our next president.

Things change, don’t they? The ever-comforting fact is that more important things stay just as they are. Human nature is one of them, and that’s how my novels, addressing essential and universal questions as they do, seem to stay relevant over a wonderfully lengthy period of time.

Here we are at the end of another February. We first saw Boone on Leap Day, in what was set as 2012. She was in Terry Bradley’s office, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). She was dressed to the nines, catty, and drinking on duty. Despite everything in her poor first impressions, there was an underlying element of unlimited potential. Over the course of her character arc, she more than any other figure has fulfilled my catalogue.

In a sense, all my novels to date comprise parts of Sean’s File. He is in his backstory, throughout Jon’s Trilogy, and appears in every episode of Boone’s File as well. The man, in fact, appears in every novel I’ve written save one. Boone will return for her backstory retrospective, God willing, in my final release perhaps next year. Two titles in Sean’s File are queued for production before we get there.

For now, Ghosts of the Republic closes a number of character arcs for antagonists and protagonists admirable and despicable as their life choices warrant. I won’t expound on the mission of the novel here — better you discover that for yourself — more than I have in the afterword. Suffice it to say the title explores relevant themes in a way that makes me glad I could publish the thing before real life paralleled the story line.

Here’s the blurb:

“Homicides of prominent figures spike inside the Beltway, and D.C. is on edge.

Presented with an ultimatum from the Director of National Intelligence to find their killers or shoulder the blame, Peter McAllen’s people devote themselves to a singularly vital mission. Interested parties range from Congressional inquisitors to agents of a spiteful liberal news media determined to ferret out InterLynk’s every past move and present ally. None of them are helping.

Boone, Daniel Sean Ritter, and their allies navigate an alarming scenario. If prime movers are using threats to political stability in the world’s last superpower to institute a constitutional crisis, who can they trust?

Approx. 85,000 words / 325 pp print length”

GOTR is going live everywhere as I write this. I will post its Big List of Links once they are available.

Thank you. Choose to love. -DA

Sean and Muhammad

Perhaps a detailed psychoanalysis can explain where the ideas for a writer’s work originate. If so—despite my degree in that area of study—it is unlikely that I would take such a conclusion seriously in any case. Science tends to discount the notion that the mind is a spiritual crossroad, and tends to fall into the trap of human arrogance in assuming all of our thoughts and inspirations are our own.

In The Anvil of the Craftsman, Farrah’s son Gabir and the story’s mysterious military man have a brief conversation regarding Gabir’s father Muhammad. He was a man whose memory resided in reverence, seemingly by everyone who knew him. It was a scene that demanded the fulfillment of the back-story from the moment I wrote the words.

Whether a reader knows my Air Force Special Operator as Matt Kameldorn—his nom de guerre in Anvil—Drew Domenick from The Britteridge Heresy, or Daniel Sean Ritter from Killing Doctor Jon, he is a character whose intrigue draws the reader close. They seemed to want to know more, and so did I. The result was a parallel series to Jon’s Trilogy now beginning: Sean’s File, opening with his first novel Operation Naji.

Heroes, Villains, and ordinary people are made, not born. Each story has a beginning, and middle, and an end. In Naji, we see the beginnings of the man in whom training, talent, and dedication would coalesce to produce a warrior. That, however, is not the whole purpose of the work.

The heart of the novel remains a question in the deep blue water of theology, and that is the basis for salvation. Those of you who have absorbed my work may find my ideas divergent in that regard, though as with everything my opinions result from dedicated consideration. I see our origins in the work of a Craftsman: one who takes the time needed to produce His desired result, and Who is very good at what He does. I believe that skill is applied across cultures and faiths, due to the engineered capacity of the human soul to find its way back home. We humans do that by addressing essential and universal questions—consciously or not—and with a result determined by our individual character, capacity, and determination.

One believes in salvation by grace through faith, or one does not. Personally, I see the accommodation of Christ as an eternal fixture in a perfect plan rather than as a point of legality in a historical timeline. Some overly rigid doctrinalists will doubtless take issue with a Christian writer placing a Muslim as the main narrative character in Naji. Nevertheless, the novel brings across the message given as I wrote, and I have no regrets concerning the result.

Operation Naji is now in the very final stages of editing, and shall—God willing—soon go on to proofing and formatting and thence to its beta readers. Once published, the same faith telling me this endeavor of writing was worthwhile assures me that the novel will achieve its intended influence. Maybe only a few will read it, or perhaps many. It is what it is, and I think it a story that will not be forgotten once absorbed. Sean, of course, deserves that, as does Muhammad … certainly even more.

Choose to Love, -DA

Vince Flynn—Remembered

Writers of Political Fiction are flying their colors at half-staff this week as a memorial to Vince Flynn, author of a dynamic series of novels that continue to hold the attention of his fan base. His titles are familiar here, as they were always and doubtless will continue to be constant occupants in the top listings of the genre we share.

Vince Flynn—whose journey, by the way, began with self-publishing—pleased his audience. His achievement is reflected in his rankings in Amazon Best Sellers, but just as significant and more laudable is his residence in Amazon Top Rated. As of this writing, Mr. Flynn’s titles occupy seven of the Top Twenty slots by customer ranking.

It is good writing that will be remembered. Literature endures past the span of its author. Writing well grants a legacy of remembrance that travels past the point in time where one’s children will grow old and pass on in their own journey. There is a secret promise in the crafting of words … one that offers an opportunity to endure. Thoughts frozen in time by transcription carry forward the mind of their author, and hold a chance for that much immortality at least. We still read Homer nearly three millennia later, and we do so because he chose to write.

Vince Flynn did so as well, and his results speak for themselves. Congratulations, sir. You used what time you were granted to its best effect, which is as much as any of us can hope to do.

Choose to Love, -DA

Boone

Over the course of the last few months, I have been spending my days with a woman named Rebecca Boone Hildebrandt. Not to worry, friends and family; technically she does not exist—except in roughly four hundred and fifty pages of fiction that so far only I have seen.

Boone is the heroine (yes, I still use gender-specific terms) of a trilogy a bit over halfway to completion. Jon Anthony now has three titles of his own (two published, the third coming this winter), and everyone’s favorite Air Force officer has received his own back-story. Another vision now has residence in the private work space of my mind, and is at present flowing into some of the best prose that I have ever written.

Jon Anthony, my quiet, soft-spoken academic and man of unshakable faith, is one of those people whom one meets only now and again in life, a soul in which God’s enemy has never found a foothold. Mademoiselle Hildebrandt is someone quite different.

Boone lives in a world of deep, dark secrets. She works for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. This top executive level of the United States Intelligence Community is the consolidating entity of intelligence organs in the U.S. government and is headquartered in McLean, Virginia. Her intellect and physical abilities have aided her ascension to the position of Level One Case Officer, and her job description in its most terse form is to solve problems that most will never know existed.

Boone’s exceptional ability to retain information had her leaving high school early, to study physiology in Europe, where she also navigated academe at an accelerated pace. Her doctorate secured, two years of training in the martial arts followed in Vietnam, studying the techniques of practitioners similarly small in stature, yet very dangerous.

For all her wondrous abilities, Boone is a flawed character. Her faith at the onset of her debut, Absinthe and Chocolate, is practically nonexistent. She has a problem with alcohol. She takes the stresses of her work, the loneliness of her existence, and the weight of the lives she has extinguished and channels them into intoxication and sexual outlet.

Boone’s story, as all of ours shall be, is a tale of change. She is part hero (yes, sometimes I also use gender-neutral terms), part victim, and composed of both steel and velvet. She is, as one of her revelations in The Bonus Pool relays, “… all light, darkness, death, life, joy and grief, wrapped in a package that most people simply called Boone.”

The woman is a work in progress, in the pages of her fiction and in the part she plays in what God is doing, as are we all. Her purpose is unapparent, as it is for many of us, and will take patience to comprehend fully. Knowing her has nevertheless blessed me, and I am glad to be the woman’s chronicler.

There are many roads to the same destination. Boone and I are on one less traveled. I hope that my readers will understand.

Choose to Love, -DA