Tag Archives: suspense

TYP Full Release Links


A followup to my previous post: Novel10/Sean4, The Yemeni Package is here, there, and everywhere you’re likely to look. As promised, here are the links:

Amazon Kindle
Amazon trade paperback
iTunes
Nook
Kobo
Smashwords
Scribd

 

As always, I appreciate your support, your reads, and especially your reviews. Those last, especially, will never stop helping me.

Choose to Love, -DA

*****

In production news, Novel11/Boone5, A Garden in Russia, is undergoing continuity and fact checking via Content Edit prior to the heavy lifting of production editing, which will to take place through the spring and summer. More info is available by visiting my In The Works page.

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The Yemeni Package

By convention, it’s recommended that an author read in his or her own genre and thereby enhance the ability of “writing to market.”  I generally do not, because these days works need to be well conceived, structured, and written to hold my attention, and those increasingly seem few and far between. Besides, I want to write my words, not a rehashed version of theirs. The market can decide what it wants afterward.

Heroes in some very popular series seem to evolve little, if at all, over the span of their respective runs. Life, of course, doesn’t allow stagnation. Each of us change day by day, growing or diminishing or managing both at once in different measures. That people will change makes character stagnation in series fiction a point of departure from reality, and over the long term, in my opinion at least, degrades the sense of attachment between the reader and the characters they engage. Being real, in and out of the bubble of immersion, is a vital part of maintaining any relationship.

So, as Novel10/Sean4 The Yemeni Package opens, we have a non-typical vision of the subject of its story, Daniel Sean Ritter. At this peak in both his career with Air Force Special Operations and physically, the man is also worn down by an invisible op force: pain, grief, and accumulated postoperative trauma. In having experienced more intensity in his thirty years than some will accumulate in a long, comfortable lifetime, he is paying the price. At the branch of his trail is one path leading to a summit, and the other descending into decline.

What sort of life produces a man like Ritter? What grants him the will to win without making him a brute? What price has he paid for taking so many lives in the course of duty? He’s not fragile, not weak by any means, just human. Ritter embodies the noble spirit of longsuffering and resilience related by Kipling’s mighty poem, If, a portion of which reminds us that one can:

 …force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

Ritter, as his Sean’s File series chronicles, held on through the events of the 1990s to appear as the iconic lone wolf AFSOC operator attached to U.S. Army Intelligence’s General Peter McAllen in the first title of Jon’s Trilogy, The Anvil of the Craftsman, where we initially met him under the nom de guerre Matt Kameldorn. In The Yemeni Package we see how, when, and why that happened … as well as why an Air Force major remained, at age thirty-eight, unattached other than by his interservice agreement with his handler.

Everything in my catalogue followed, once the decade of his back-story was completed. The three volumes of Jon’s Trilogy are set in the first decade of the new century, with Boone’s File following in the next. Ritter is there through every one of those stories to date, adding to the fabric sustaining their integrity.

He’s just a man, but a spectacular man. Daniel Sean Ritter was preserved through his formative experiences by essential strength and the hope for a possible future. It’s one he achieved in my second novel, by the way, but it would be better that you learn the details for yourself.

Here’s the blurb:

The year is 1999. Following a failed attack on a USAF base, the leader of an emergent and radical Islamic organization is offered to the United States by his captors. Under political oversight in the persona of a beautiful and deadly female case officer and aided by an apostate cleric, a mothballed Air Force Special Operations unit designated Deep Recovery is tapped for the mission. Their task: quietly deliver a captured terrorist, held overseas, into American custody.

Blindsided by the scope of an opposing force drawn from the ranks of a fanatical cult of personality, Daniel Sean Ritter’s mission intensifies once matters turn deadly. A simple detainee transfer then becomes a hunt for the most wanted man in the region.

Domestic and international political pressures erode their civilian leadership’s resolve. Its operators in the field are left diminished and isolated, forced into a quandary of whom their government wishes to prevail … and into the realization that true strength sometimes is found where there is no one to trust but oneself.

Approx. 81,800 wds. / 300 pp. print length

As usual, an update will be posted later this week as buy links go live.

Choose to Love, -DA

Ends and Beginnings

Ends and beginnings. They are the stuff of December.

One year ends, and another begins. Perennially it is a time of fresh starts, new plans, and renewed contemplation provided by the short days and cozy nights of the winter quarter.

These twelve days of the Christmas season find Novel10/Sean4 The Yemeni Package in the last stages of editing, with external proofreading to take place as the first order of business in 2018. Ritter’s fourth should follow by the end of January, if we are so blessed. As ever, one project ends and another begins.

Ritter’s story documents the building of a remarkable man, whose appearance in each of  my novels marks him as the singular character to do so. Ends and beginnings mark his life as they do everyone’s. His story, like ours—and Jon Anthony’s, and Boone’s in their own titles for that matter—concerns itself as much with the people who contribute to the main character’s life as it is about the protagonist of any particular title.

Where does Daniel Sean Ritter fit into the catalog? Ritter is goal-oriented where Jon is contemplative. Ritter’s emotions are tightly held against the flood that sometimes releases from Boone. His strength, dominant physically, matches the other two sometimes and lags in other measures. It is his whole, his balance, that makes the man indispensable.

Mick returns in Sean’s fourth title as his mentor, Blade again as his pragmatic balance, and General Peter McAllen as ever to broaden his perspective and apply the leverage of his talents where the beam between good and evil tips most effectively. You’ll meet Samir Ibrahim, an apostate Muslim scholar upon his conversion to Christianity, and one with his own agenda in pursuing the target of the adventure.

And … Thalia. A case officer tasked with the retrieval of a known terrorist by a marginally resolute National Command Authority, Thalia Kebauet is a woman who can only be adequately described after the fact. Ritter to this day is unlikely to disagree, and that is what can be said of her for the time being.

Ends and beginnings. There is perhaps one more episode of Sean’s File in the catalog timeline between The Yemeni Package, which takes place largely in 1999,  and the 2006 pre-Surge setting of The Anvil of the Craftsman. If undertaken, it would be supplemental, not necessary. Worthwhile and necessary are not dependent attributes, though, in any but the most austere life.

Ritter’s back-story leads the chronology of my novels, with Jon’s Trilogy set in the middle as my common character universe merges into Boone’s File. Those episodes are, as I discovered along the way, all parts of the same tale taking place across three series, each in its respective decade.

All of our lives proceed in similar fashions. We too have our contributing characters, because none of us do any of this alone. One encounters them in chapters and titles while self-designating the most significant markers of one’s own timeline. Let us, as did Ben Franklin, credit its plot structure to our Author and Finisher.

Life lived well is a work of reality rather than fiction. Moment after moment is presented as part of the Whole to build we who pay attention or bless us, but never to break us. We who believe are made of God’s stuff and cannot be undone. That we exit the timeline after our designated interval marks only an end and another beginning. It will be wonderful for the faithful and horrid for the unadvocated, respective to each resultant and individual destination.

Our burden ends, you see, where His sufficiency begins. Mark your milestones and lessons along the way toward a successful conclusion and in the great hope revealed in the first Christmas season, for the appearance of Jesus is His Father’s testimony that the least life is far too precious a treasure to live accidentally. Ritter, in embracing his Pararescue Creed’s maxim, That Others May Live, says as much with his heroics.

You and I and Sean are characters each in the other’s story, and for that I am thankful. If my writing helps you along your way, so much the better. I hope to learn it was so, once we meet in endless better and brighter days.

Choose to love, -DA

*****

In production news, next month’s Vae Obscurum will be the go-live announcement for Daniel Sean Ritter’s fourth title, The Yemeni Package, God willing. Now is a great time to begin the novels of Sean’s File.

Boone’s fourth is available!

Actions have consequences, some of which are predictable … and some not. In Boone’s fourth novel, complications arising out of her covert history interfere with an attempt to start a new life.

Following simultaneous attacks in Washington and Moscow, Boone and her allies learn of what was thought to be an extinct breed of predator: Vedro Krovi (VAY-dro KROWV-yi), a company of Russian mercenaries unleashed by patrons uncomprehending of the level of commitment and ruthlessness they have unwittingly engaged.

This, while Deborah Vosse—the premier investigative journalist for her left-leaning ForwardNews network—is prompted by the murder of a colleague to examine the relationship between heads of state and the shadowy figures of international intelligence. Connections never intended for public knowledge begin to unveil those who covertly enabled or interdicted the agendas of masters or enemies.

The plot develops into Boone’s largest challenge to date, with everything she holds dear, including her beckoning life and freedom, at risk on multiple fronts.

Here’s the blurb:

“Boone, now a former covert operative, looks forward to a fulfilling marriage, new career, and brighter days. Investigative journalism by one of her country’s most prominent news personalities, however, begins to unravel a thread of actualities thought to have been classified out of existence. Actions once undertaken in the national interest threaten her new life.

When not only Boone’s people but the servants of the ill-intended and powerful are targeted for elimination, the result is an undeclared war between the keepers and the kept. Forced back into a high-stakes game against international players, she will need to call on all her resources in order to defend those whom she loves against two of the world’s most powerful men … and sins of her past.

Approx. 92,370 wds./ 323 pp. print length”

Boone’s Big List of Links:
Kindle – iTunes – Nook – Kobo – Smashwords – Scribd

Trade paperbacks at Amazon and CreateSpace!

As always, your contributions toward signal boost in spreading the word are appreciated. Read. Rock. Review. Recruit. Repeat.

Choose to love, -DA

*****

In more production news, Ritter’s fourth title, The Yemeni Package, has entered Content Edit in preparation for an anticipated first quarter 2018 release.

Your Part of the Story

Or is it You’re Part of the Story? Either sense is correct. Interconnectedness is a vital aspect of the human experience, and without an appreciation of the precept, we would each develop into someone far below our potential.

You, however, are my readers. I’m not content to leave you there.

Many worthwhile things can be accomplished on an individual level, and some of those in no way else. Even the most independent achievement, however, is the culmination of capability fostered by affecting influences. Those are the drops and rivulets contributing to the flow of who we are and what we do … for better or worse.

Likewise, each event in the past contributes its part to the composition of the current scene. Frank Capra did a better than adequate job of illustrating totality in It’s a Wonderful Life, so I won’t bother to recap his conclusions here. It’s a pity, though, that sometimes this essential realization drops while reading fiction when we so wholeheartedly embrace it watching that film. I sometimes wonder if its absence also contributes to a less-than-sufficient grasp of history generally, much less the problems this can cause with dedicating attention to a novel.

I mention every so often how much I dislike encountering formulaic fiction. Emphases vary between plot-driven and character-driven structure such as mine. One won’t find action leading the way in a Dale Amidei novel, for the same reason that unanticipated, out-of-context conduct in real life generates confusion and anxiety in its witnesses. The ideal here is removed from pulpy exploits and steeped in substance instead, and the distinction sometimes requires the accumulation of momentum in defining a character’s situation.

Structure, done from farther out than a singular or first-person perspective, sometimes requires this. I’ve never written under the latter restriction, much preferring the weave of multiple points of view I encountered in my best formative reading. Reading first was a process that stretched across four decades before attempting my own serious novel, one that ran somewhere past thirty consecutive five-stars on Amazon and once was, by one website’s weighting, the second highest-rated fiction title in the Kindle store.

Character-driven fiction requires an investment on the part of the reader in the imaginary folk he or she is encountering. Its dividend must be paid by the author, but this takes time. It also, sometimes unfortunately, requires depositing a span of attention nearly every aspect of modern life seems intent on degrading. No one, if you’ve not noticed, ever dies in a Dale Amidei Chapter One. In Chapter Two and following all bets are off … but by then you will at least have an inkling of what’s happening and why.

What and Why, now that Boone is about to appear in her fourth novel, both play a vital role in her latest adventure. The interconnectedness to which I alluded in beginning this post is coming full circle; the cascading implications of fulfilled duty in her previous title, One Last Scent of Jasmine, extends from Washington to Moscow as two of the world’s most powerful men turn to ruthless pragmatism in seeking to distance themselves from their moral culpabilities.

Boone’s fourth is now set to appear on June 28, 2017. I hope you’ll be coming along on a trip not to be missed, whether you jumped into my interconnected character universe through Jon’s Trilogy, or Sean’s File, or with Boone’s debut in Absinthe and Chocolate. She and I need your reads, your reviews, and your help in boosting my signal on social media. You’re part of this story, and once it’s finished, I promise that Boone’s will remain part of you. To produce a novel that shakes the blessed earth is my prime motivation of course, but also to go forward with you from then on. Afterward, both of us will hopefully fulfill the clear vision of our Craftsman within the remainder of what He intends.

You do your part. I’ll do mine.

Choose to Love, -DA

*****

In production news, as mentioned above, Boone’s fourth novel, Meat for the Lion, is progressing through its final quality assurance steps before publishing later this month. Once retail pages are live, her Big List of Links will appear here as a separate post.

Review of ‘The Caliphate’

As I’ve said elsewhere, I am generally in the business of producing books, not reviewing them. As the Editress also has learned, doing what we do well sometimes makes it difficult to find a satisfying work in which to lose oneself through the magic of immersion. Recently I did that, and my resulting thoughts exceeded the venue of a retail book review. Here’s the first part of what I had to say about author friend Anna Erishkigal’s latest:

The Caliphate is wound around the premise that an ISIS-like conquest of the United States has been successful. One might think ‘Yeah, like that would ever happen,’ until Erishkigal constructs her disturbingly plausible backdrop for the novel to follow.

Eisa McCarthy is a faithful Muslim, one who refuses to set aside her humanity in the name of doctrine. We see the story through her eyes as she navigates her difficult path. Burdened by memories of a father now besmirched by propagandized history into the image of a traitor, she finds herself propelled by her circumstances into a fold of resistance marking America’s last efforts at redemption.

'The Caliphate' on Amazon

Get it on Amazon

The parallels the author draws between the current landscape in Syria and Iraq and a future United States are unsettling, as they portray present-day atrocities with unflinching accuracy. The dominion of evil Eisa opposes is factual, departing only in scope from conditions experienced already inside less fortunate borders. Likewise, the courage of female fighters against a misogynistic foe is drawn from our world and extended into the author’s adroit, fictional presentation.

One is left with the conclusion that, yes, this could happen here. If it does, we will have the same choices Eisa, her compatriots, and fellow victims of dominant, Islamist fundamentalism do: resist for the sake of those who can or will not, or hope for the best at the sparse mercy of conscienceless oppressors.

Overall, a solid work of thriller/suspense and an easy five stars.”

That was the easy part. Dealing with the threads of actuality the author pulled together into to this work  came next, all part of the era our world will attempt to resolve into the foreseeable future.

One of her themes is the nature of absolutism, in particular Islamofascism of the type now plaguing portions of Iraq and Syria. Fundamentalist Muhammadanism continues to export its proponents into every corner of the globe via the infrastructure of a world growing smaller by the year. As in Anna’s backstory, misplaced guilt and sympathy provided the inroad for a substantial population of assets who intended to fulfill the vision of their Prophet:  to conquer each piece of land on which they place their foot.

Here stateside, we only days ago decided a presidential election. One of the major candidates for years had been advised by a staffer connected to the transnational, Sunni Islamist ‘Muslim Brotherhood.’ Huma Abedin fulfilled for Hillary Clinton a role similar to Valerie Jarrett, a current Senior Advisor to the President and of Iranian birth who principally influences his foreign policy. Had the electoral process gone another way, through  the fruition of policies enabling Muslim influx we might have been well on the way toward the same type of soft cultural  jihad currently being suffered by Europe.

Anna extended the premise into a plausible scenario, in which the movement eventually gains control of America’s nuclear arsenal. Afterward the regime holds the threat of annihilation over not only America but the remainder of the civilized world.

There she hits another thread weaving itself through human history. There are two types of us, you see. The first and perhaps the larger contingent would rather give in than get hurt. Those hope for the best, that their predators in life will pass them by, and that they will be allowed to continue what is an essentially undeserved existence. For the bright spirits, the heroes amongst us such as Anna’s protagonist Eisa McCarthy, the opposite philosophy takes hold. From somewhere within, the Spirit finds a foothold, and one finds the reverse to be true. Courage follows, and one threads a path though fear forward to decisive action.

Conflict is tiresome, and those who seek to dominate their fellows know this. Domineering personalities therefore promote division at every level possible, so their policies might eventually flourish through a lack of resistance. Fear likewise is a circumstance the undeveloped soul seeks to avoid. Violence and its terrifying aftermath, of course, is the most effective cowing agent of all.

So it is under the rule of ISIS within the bounds of its miserable territory today. It is well to remember the laws of human nature are as much in effect in this country as they are in the Near East.

We enshrine and protect freedom of religion in our Constitution. Such recognition resulted to ensure the freedom from oppression for the devout and conscientious. Islam of the modernistic, reformed variety—the sort content to reside in the front half of the Qur’an as encountered in the Balkans—seeks only to worship the God of Abraham after the prompting of the Spirit as do their brother Jews and Christians. Such folk choose love over hate and indifference, and bother no one as a result.

Islam metastasized is an altogether different entity. There, civilized harmony is antithetical to the later verses of Muhammadan scripture they embrace, in which adherents are instructed to accept the latter of contradictory guidance. Those are the chapters, which encourage terror and subjugation, making the global war between twenty-first and seventh-century philosophies what it is.

Such can no longer be tolerated under the banner of ‘freedom of religion.’ As the social media meme points out, if your religion requires you to kill me to get to heaven, I don’t need to tolerate that. Assigning constitutional protection to the polar opposite of Americanism and an ideology of conquest is beyond foolish; it is self-destructive.

Islam, particularly in Wahhabism, cannot be considered only another quaint religious tradition safe for the imagined secular humanist to dismiss and ignore. It engenders, as Winston Churchill observed, a distinct fanaticism as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog. Past a certain point, the two afflictions have only a singular and identical course of effective treatment.

Anna Erishkigal’s characters, particularly her women, you may rest assured become masters of addressing this condition in their enemies. We might contend with Eisa McCarthy’s premise that “Allah has no sons, only daughters,” but in the end we cheer the courage that is her byproduct of faith. These contests, as they have throughout history, retain a significance beyond the contexts of their actors. There are lessons there, unseen if unsought, God-placed for those who will.

Choose to love, -DA

Sean’s File No.3 is live!

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As promised, the Big List of Links for Sean’s third:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M1IPP28
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id1157844072
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/king-of-a-lesser-hill-dale-amidei/1124673739
https://store.kobobooks.com/en-us/ebook/king-of-a-lesser-hill
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/667519
https://www.scribd.com/book/324992600/King-of-a-Lesser-Hill-Sean-s-File-3
https://www.amazon.com/King-Lesser-Hill-Seans-File/dp/0998149500

Here is the blurb:

*This novel portrays acts of atrocity during the Bosnian Civil War of the 1990s. Though presented with sensitivity, some scenes might prove disturbing to survivors of conflict and/or violence against women.

In 1995’s Bosnia and Herzegovina, a USAF pilot, forced to eject over Serb-controlled territory, evades capture with the help of a young Bosnian woman and a sympathetic band of Croat militia. With a ruthless Serbian commander also on the hunt, it falls to Daniel Sean Ritter and his sergeants—now designated the Deep Recovery Team—to find the American first.

Stung by setbacks inflicted by an opposing coalition on multiple fronts, Serb paramilitary forces escalate operations as their window of opportunity narrows. Atrocities, reprisals, and response fuel a final conflagration in the embers of war. Its disposition will hinge on the courage found in those who have discovered the passions of Bosnia are ones from which they are unable to walk away.

Approx. 83,300 wds. / 290 pp. print length

As always, much appreciation to those of your offering your support through this three-year process of bring another title to life. Without you, an author’s voice is only imagination.

Choose to love, -DA